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I could. Maori and geothermal areas in Rotorua

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Our trip to New Zealand was coming to an end and some friends recommended visiting I could where we could know a little more closely the Maori culture and as a gift visit one of the most emblematic geysers in the country, the geyser Pohutu. Certainly of the latter we were already a little saturated after visiting Wai-o-Tapu and Waimangu, but what the hell, if visiting Te Puia I can seethe haka, the famous dance that the All-Blacks dance in each game would satisfy me.


I could. Maori and thermal zones in Rotorua

I could. Something more than an area of ​​thermal activities

We return to Roturoa after a route passed by water in the Tongariro National Park. Such was the amount of water we wore in our pants that it had soaked until we could no longer. That is why we decided to look for a campsite where to leave our caravan and be able to rest as God commands. Great success because by chance the campsite had hot springs that we took full advantage.

The next day we approached Te Puia first thing in the morning, knowing that later it could collapse. Upon arrival we pay the entrance fee, 59$They gave us a map of the area and a series of schedules where we could see various activities carried out by the Maori. As the dance started just at that time, we went directly to the so-called meeting house Aronui to Rua.


I could. Maori and thermal zones in Rotorua

I have to admit that it is very, very tourism oriented and that these Maori no longer lived like years ago. Today they are fully integrated with the rest of the population (the settlers) and in Te Puia they simply show us what life was like last.

At least to the delight of tourists, they danced the Haka and to top it off they took us to the stage to imitate them and of course make a fool of themselves.


I could. Maori and thermal zones in Rotorua

After the dancer moment we took the map they had given us at the entrance and decided to pass point by point. The first thing was to see the recreation of the Maori village and then go to a small compound called Ngã Manu Ahurei where they had several kiwifruit in captivity. These were behind a glass with very little light, which hindered their vision. However, being eminently nocturnal animals, nothing else could be done.


I could. Maori and thermal zones in Rotorua

Then we pass through a mud lagoon of generous proportions and that did not invite you to take a dip. It is so active that bits of mud scattered constantly in all directions.


I could. Maori and thermal zones in Rotorua

From here we march to the star attraction of Te Puia, the Pohutu Geyser, which went into action every few minutes wetting all those people who passed by a nearby bridge and that logically were not expected.


I could. Maori and thermal zones in Rotorua

After enjoying the Pohutu geyser, we go to other mud lagoons called Ngapuna Tokutoru Hauanu. These were not as interesting as the previous ones and their activity is much lower.


I could. Maori and thermal zones in Rotorua

Perhaps it was best to find small holes where very hot water flowed and with a rather unpleasant sulfur smell.


I could. Maori and thermal zones in Rotorua

Later we headed to Waikite Geyser With little hope of seeing it in action. The map clearly said that he was inactive and logically he was not mistaken. In fact there is another geyser, the Papakura and is also dead dead.


I could. Maori and thermal zones in Rotorua

We continue the walk through different formations where a constant smoke emanated and therefore quite hot. This counteracted with the cold we were suffering, around 5 degrees :-(.


I could. Maori and thermal zones in Rotorua

The road was ending and near the Maori village we found the Ngararatuatara lagoon. This in theory was used for cooking and in fact it is still used in some demonstrations for tourists, but just at that time there was no chef in the area.


I could. Maori and thermal zones in Rotorua

And with this we ended our visit to I could that if it does not become for the haka I simply would not have entered.


I could. Maori and thermal zones in Rotorua

Practical data

Before leaving for New Zealand

  • New Zealand's Planet Planet Guide
  • Airport Transfers
  • Car rental in New Zealand with 15% discount
  • New Zealand map

How much is admission?

Prices vary every year but the stipulated price for the 2016/2017 season is 52$ onwards. For example if we want to see the haka, they are 59$ and there are 4 daily performances.

What time does Waimangu have?

Opens at 09:00 AM.

Where to sleep?

It is best to sleep in Rotorua, less than 30 minutes from Waimangu. As we went with a motorhome through New Zealand, we decided to look for a campsite to be able to recharge all the elements of the vehicle that day and be able to plug in the electric heating.

When to go?

The place can be visited all year round but of course the ideal is to do it in summer, between the months of December to February.

Other places on the North Island that you must visit

  • Tongariro Alpine Crossing, the most popular route in New Zealand.
  • The thermal area of ​​Wai-o-Tapu.
  • New Zealand. Land of Hobbits - Hobbiton.
  • The Waimangu volcanic valley

Book excursion to Te Puia

If you want to book an excursion to Te Puia and see somewhere else around, click on the following link.

 Book excursion to Te Puia

Motorhome rental in New Zealand

Here we leave several brands that they offer good prices, within reason, in New Zealand and even in Australia. Some are comparators, but we believe, after looking at many, these are the ones that offer the best price.

AGENCYDISCOUNTLINK

Discovery motorhomes
Comparator of the main motorhome brands(Recommended!)Press here

Drive now
 Comparator of the main motorhome brandsPress here

Travel insurance

For a trip like this it is best to take out insurance. Iati offers us a offer for followers Travel for free. Traveling does not exempt you from having an accident, needing a doctor, a transfer or medication. Do not play it. Check the travel insurance by clicking on the banner and you will have a 5% in your insurance for being a travel reader for free. If you want more information click here.

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